Romance & Sex

The Kiss of the 1800s and Tales Associated with It

A kiss is the touching or pressing of one’s lips against another person and the romantic kiss of the 1800s was much like a romantic kiss of today, one that expresses sentiments of love, attraction, affection, romance, or passion. Author Kristoffer Nyrop in his 1901 book, The Kiss and Its History, had a lot to…

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What Constitutes a Regency Betrothal

During Regency times, people generally married for love. Arranged marriages usually did not occur unless you were royalty. Apparently, however, sometimes Regency people found to their surprise they were engaged. This happened because of mistakes or misunderstanding, but such mistakes or misunderstandings could be devastating or even ruinous to an innocent party. One nineteenth-century monthly…

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Qualifications for A Georgian Wife or Husband

Marriage was something almost every Georgian man and woman expected but they also wanted the “perfect” mate to marry. This caused one author to write, “Let those women who seek a perfect husband, or those men who desire a perfect wife, be told by the Christian to look to some other quarter; let them indeed;…

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School of Love: Dorimon and Alithea

In 1773 answers for the love lorn could be found in an eighteen century magazine. The magazine had the School of Love providing the advice, and among those who had concerns about their love life was an eighteenth century married woman named Charlotte. Charlotte posed the following question to the School of Love: “My husband…

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Humorous Clauses Proposed for The Marriage Act of 1753

The Marriage Act of 1753 was enacted to require a formal ceremony of marriage because clandestine marriages achieved by crossing over the Scottish border caused disputes as to their validity. One newspaper proposed some humorous clauses be added to the Marriage Act and here they are in their entirety. When two young thoughtless fools, having…

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Greenwich Hoax and a Love Gone Wrong

Joseph Thornton, son of a respectable tradesman, was charged with fraud all because of a hoax and a love gone wrong. The story begins with another young man named Joseph Dale. He received an anonymous but elegantly written letter in a female hand signed with the initials E.B. Dale mentioned the letter to Thornton because…

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Courtship and A Love Gone Wrong

Christiana Wighton, a young girl, “verging on womanhood,” was the daughter of John Wighton, and he was head gardener to Henry Stafford-Jerningham, 9th Baron Stafford. One January evening in 1863, between nine and ten o’clock in the morning, Christiana and her younger brother James, a lad of fourteen, were proceeding home. They were some distance…

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Gretna Green – The Place for Elopements

In 1753 the “Marriage Act in Churches,” popularly known as Lord Hardwicke’s Marriage Act, passed in England. It suppressed clandestine marriages by requiring English and Welsh couples to marry in a church and to be 21 or older to marry without parental consent. This resulted in clandestine marriages being conducted in Scotland where the requirements…

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Bristol Elopement of Clementina Clerke and Richard Vining Perry

One of the more well-known elopements of the 1790s involved a precocious 14-year-old girl named Clementina Clerke and a handsome Bristol surgeon-apothecary Richard Vining Perry. Clerke who was described as “modest, amiable … obliging, timid and not forward,”[1] eloped from a boarding school in Bristol operated by the Mills sisters (Selina and Mary). Clerke was…

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Courtship and a Woman’s Responsibilities

Courtship preceded an engagement and was a period of time that allowed a man and woman to discover whether or not they were compatible. Because marriage was the goal in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, courtship was important, and perspective mates attempted to put their best foot forward. Women could accomplish this by following proper…

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