Regency Era

A Regency Era Female Husband – James Allen

The idea that a woman would pretend to be a male was considered shocking in the Regency Era. One woman who perpetrated such a hoax was commonly known as James Allen. Allen’s situation came to light when Allen, who was 42 years old and a sawyer, was fatally struck in the head by a piece…

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Winter of 1813-1814: The Great London Fog and Frost

During the winter of 1813-1814, a thick fog rolled into London. It was followed by a terrible frost and one of the coldest periods on record occurred from January to March. One newspaper reported it was “the heaviest mist and thickest fog ever remembered … [which] produced the thickest and most beautiful hoar frost that…

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What Constitutes a Regency Betrothal

During Regency times, people generally married for love. Arranged marriages usually did not occur unless you were royalty. Apparently, however, sometimes Regency people found to their surprise they were engaged. This happened because of mistakes or misunderstanding, but such mistakes or misunderstandings could be devastating or even ruinous to an innocent party. One nineteenth-century monthly…

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Elizabeth Armistead: Courtesan to Charles James Fox

Elizabeth Armistead was born Elizabeth Bridget Cane on 11 July 1750. Little is known about her early years and what is known is debated. Some people say that Elizabeth was born in a cellar, her father was a cheese-and-bacon vendor, and her mother “addicted herself to the culling and vending of simples.”[1] Elizabeth supposedly first…

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Fishermen Superstitions

Similar to other people, fishermen had superstitious beliefs and believed certain things caused good or back luck. For instance, fishermen superstitions resulted in seafarers’s claiming a newborn’s caul would secure its wearer from drowning. There was also a belief that breaking up an old boat would bring bad luck and that those engaged in such…

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Work Horses in the Regency Era

Horses were an important part of earning a living during the Regency Era. One way horses helped out was hauling loads in and around cities, and they were also a vital necessity on farms because agriculture was still one of the main ways Regency people earned livings. Moreover, Regency people used different horses depending on…

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Regency Female Prisoners at Newgate

The living standards for rural women in England and Wales appears to have become worse as the Industrial Revolution progressed. Moreover, it affected younger and younger rural women. This may have been one reason why one 1960s study shows that in 1795, the average age of a woman incarcerated was 36.94. By 1809, the average…

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Regency Traveling Tips

Traveling in the British Isles or on the European Continent was something done regularly by Regency people. To make traveling as comfortable as possible, one Regency writer gathered a variety of tips, and, here they are in their entirety: Tips for Traveling in the British Isles  Where persons travel for pleasure, or when they are…

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Fifteen Things a Good Georgian Coachman Would Not Do

Coachmen were the people entrusted with the management of a person’s carriage and horses. It was important they be reliable, honest, and wise, as a traveler’s safety depended on these traits. For instance, when traveling in a coach, loose nuts and bolts occurred frequently. “A Careful Coachman” was said to be the person willing to…

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