Georgian Era

Wrong Doings of Married Women

In 1833, two English women — a Mrs. Emma Lush (wife to a groom employed by the Royal Family) and Mrs. Sarah Wolfe (a servant in a distinguished family) — decided to go on a shopping excursion. After making several purchases, they fell into the company of two strangers who prevailed upon them to accompany…

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Qualifications for A Georgian Wife or Husband

Marriage was something almost every Georgian man and woman expected but they also wanted the “perfect” mate to marry. This caused one author to write, “Let those women who seek a perfect husband, or those men who desire a perfect wife, be told by the Christian to look to some other quarter; let them indeed;…

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Carp in the Pants

A country gentleman kept a court leet at his manor. However, because there was so little business, the judge came but once a year. Whenever the yearly court was held, the country gentleman always invited his neighbors to a fine feast.

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Detecting the Villainous in Georgian London

Country folk visiting Georgian London and returning unscathed with their purse or their virtue intact was a rare thing. It was easy for gullible country visitors to be taken advantage of by nefarious crooks who sought to obtain a country person’s hard-earned cash or to despoil an innocent virgin and turn her into a whore.…

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An Englishman Traveling in France in 1822

It was common for the English to travel to France. One nineteenth century English traveler kept detailed notes about his 1822 trip and experiences as he traveled from Calais to Paris, France. He also noted the reason for his trip was “to give a true picture of France and Frenchmen: if my countrymen and fair…

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Kite Carriages or Charvolants

George Pocock was an English schoolteacher who became interested in kites and began experimenting with them. His interest gradually progressed to him using kites to lift small items and then light loads. By the 1820s, Pocock was experimenting with kites that could lift people. This resulted in Pocock rigging a chair in 1824 that lifted…

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One Man’s Will in 1732

Although not a resident of Britain, one man’s will was published not only in America but also in British newspapers. The man was a Mr. Matthew A—-y and he reputedly died from causes related to “advanced Age.” For many years he worked as a bed-maker and sweeper at the local college in Cambridge, Massachusetts. As…

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Georgian Executions

In 1800, one person wrote that “a month doth not pass over in England without repeated executions; and there is scarcely a vagabond to be met with in the country who has not seen a fellow creature suspended from the gallows.” Georgian executions were plentiful enough that one person noted “it is shocking to think…

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Model of the Perfect Woman Georgian Style

Antoine Le Camus wrote Abdeker: or the Art of Preserving Beauty in 1754. It is half “oriental tale” and half recipe book filled with cosmetic recipes. In the book Camus claims that “the face is the chief Seat of Beauty.” But Camus also asserts “beauty is that Form of an entire body, which pleases every one…

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Execution of the Wrong Man in the Georgian Era

In 1727, in York, a waiter by the name of Thomas Geddely lived with a Mrs. Hannah Williams. Williams was well-to-do and owned a popular public-house. She also employed Geddely. Williams kept her money in her scrutoire (writing desk). One day she went to her scrutoire and discovered that it had been broken into and…

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