Georgian Era

Conjurors and Conjuring in the 1700s

  Conjurors and conjuring existed long before the 1700s, and in its simplest form, conjuring was a performance of tricks that appeared to be magical and usually involved some sort of sleight of hand. Well before conjuring became popular in the 1700s, conjuring performances were given in antiquity and in the middle ages. However, there…

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Wrong Doings of Married Women

In 1833, two English women — a Mrs. Emma Lush (wife to a groom employed by the Royal Family) and Mrs. Sarah Wolfe (a servant in a distinguished family) — decided to go on a shopping excursion. After making several purchases, they fell into the company of two strangers who prevailed upon them to accompany…

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Qualifications for A Georgian Wife or Husband

Marriage was something almost every Georgian man and woman expected but they also wanted the “perfect” mate to marry. This caused one author to write, “Let those women who seek a perfect husband, or those men who desire a perfect wife, be told by the Christian to look to some other quarter; let them indeed;…

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Carp in the Pants

A country gentleman kept a court leet at his manor. However, because there was so little business, the judge came but once a year. Whenever the yearly court was held, the country gentleman always invited his neighbors to a fine feast.

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One Man’s Will in 1732

Although not a resident of Britain, one man’s will was published not only in America but also in British newspapers. The man was a Mr. Matthew A—-y and he reputedly died from causes related to “advanced Age.” For many years he worked as a bed-maker and sweeper at the local college in Cambridge, Massachusetts. As…

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Model of the Perfect Woman Georgian Style

Antoine Le Camus wrote Abdeker: or the Art of Preserving Beauty in 1754. It is half “oriental tale” and half recipe book filled with cosmetic recipes. In the book Camus claims that “the face is the chief Seat of Beauty.” But Camus also asserts “beauty is that Form of an entire body, which pleases every one…

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Sharpers, Shopkeepers, and the Georgian Era

Francis Grose defined a sharper in his eighteenth century dictionary as, “A cheat, one that lives by his wits.” In fact, a sharper was a common term applied in the eighteenth century to describe a thief who used trickery to obtain possessions from their rightful owner. Many ordinary Georgians saw sharpers as romantic figures and…

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Historical Custom: The Flitch of Bacon Custom

Historical customs have long existed. For instance, in Scotland there has been a long tradition of wearing kilts, and the custom continued despite efforts to weaken Scottish support for the restoration of the James II of England by passing the Dress Act of 1746 that forbade “Highland Dress.” Another long-time custom is Lent — forty…

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