Medical

French Midwife and Doctor Named Marie Boivin

Born Marie-Anne Victoire Gillain on 9 April 1773 at Versailles, Marie was educated by nursing nuns at a nunnery located about 29 miles from the center of Paris in a commune called Étampes. There she displayed medical skill, and, in fact, her skills were strong enough she attracted the attention of Louis XVI’s sister, Madame…

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Cholera in France in the 19th Century

The first cholera pandemic began in 1816 in India and eventually reached China before receding in 1826. In 1829, a second cholera pandemic occurred in Russia. This time it marched slowly towards Poland before hitting hard in London where it became known as “King Cholera.” Parisians thought they might avoid the cholera pandemic altogether, but,…

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Smallpox Inoculation in 18th Century France

In France in the 1700s, there was great opposition to a person getting a smallpox inoculation. Part of the problem was doctors could not ensure the inoculations worked because of too many variables. For instance, to create an inoculation, doctors collected pus or scabs from someone infected with smallpox and then introduced this infected matter…

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Regency Poisons

Poisons were an important topic in the Regency Era and because of the interest in poisons, a lengthy article was published in 1828 that provide all sorts of information about poisons, including class III poisons designated as “Sedative, or Narcotic Poisons.” All of these poisons could be ingested or applied to the body and were…

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Pierre Fauchard, Dentistry, and Urine in the 18th Century

French physician Pierre Fauchard is widely credited as being the “father of modern dentistry.” He joined the navy in the late seventeenth century and quickly became interested in dental ailments due to scurvy affecting most sailors on ships. After leaving the navy, he began to practice at the University of Angers Hospital where he pioneered…

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The Parisian Quack – Dr. Mantaccini

“A young man of good family, having in a few years squandered a large estate, and reduced himself to absolute want, felt that he must either exercise his ingenuity, or starve … He soon perceived that charlatanism, or what is commonly termed ‘quackery,’ was that on which that blind benefactress — Lady Fortune — lavished…

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