Etiquette

French Funeral Etiquette and Mourning in the Late 1800s

French funeral etiquette and mourning in the late 1800s involved numerous rules. For instance, the French operated under a law that a deceased person’s corpse could not be retained by the family for more than three days after death because ice was scarce. and the ice-box was unknown at the time. Thus, “three days [was]…

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Marriage Etiquette in France in the Late 1800s

Marriage etiquette in France involved many rules. For instance, when a Frenchman decided he wanted to marry, he did not go directly to the parents and ask for their daughter’s hand in marriage. That would have been a major faux pas. Instead his best friend was charged with the delicate task of asking the parents,…

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French New Year’s Etiquette Visits in the Late 1800s

The French loved etiquette and etiquette was applied to such things as courtship, marriage, and death. The French also had etiquette rules when it came to the New Year. It was observed with calls and visits that were made to relatives and certain officials. In fact, according to one twentieth-century etiquette expert, “Not to receive…

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On French Customs and Manners by a Scotsman

Tobias George Smollett was a Scottish poet and author best known for his eighteenth century novels, which included The Adventures of Roderick Random and The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle. He was also a great traveler with strong opinions. In the mid 1700s he went abroad with his wife and did so not only for pleasure…

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French Mourning in the 1700s

The French King Louis XV issued an ordinance and reduced mourning time by half in 1716. He also “settled the particular manner in which mourning should be observed.” One rule settled was when one king mourned for another monarch, the monarch was to wear the color violet, and it was worn for three months. But…

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