Men’s Fashions 1700s

History of the Fashionable Coat, the Spencer

The Spencer coat dates from the 1790s. It was originally a woolen double-breasted, short-waisted outer coat without tails that was “cut according to its cloth” and adopted by British military officers. Although there are varying elements in the story about exactly how the Spencer coat came about, most people claim the coat originated from a…

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Cravat Tying Tips for the Georgian or Regency Gentleman

Cravats came into fashion during the Georgian Era and remained popular throughout the Regency Era. One gentlemen of that era noted the cravat “is not just a mere ornament … [but] is decidedly one of the greatest preservative of health — it is criterion by which the rank of the wearer may be at once…

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Stories of the Trousers Known as Inexpressibles

“That part of the dress which it is now unlawful to name, seems of old to have had the singular virtue of discomfiting witches and demons. Every one may have heard how the bare vision of St. Francis’ inexpressibles put the devil to flight,”[1] was one nineteenth century description of men’s trousers, known as inexpressibles.…

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Tie-wig, Bob-wig, and Bag-Wig of the 1700s

Of all the fashions of the 1700s, perhaps the wig most resembles “character of that period, embodying the artificiality, the mixture of dignity and affectation, and the pompous conventionality.”[1] The wig did not suddenly appear over night but rather grew into popularity until at one point wigs were so fashionable, if you wore your own…

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Men’s Boots – Hessians, Wellingtons, Bluchers, and Ankle-Jacks

Boots have been worn by men for years because they are hard-wearing and long-lasting. During medieval times, riding boots started to be used in heraldry. In the nineteenth century, because boots generally had a bootstrap (a loop at the top on either side), the saying developed “pull yourself up by your bootstraps,” meaning a person…

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