Medical

Cholera and Its Suggested Remedies in the Mid 1800s

Cholera comes from the Greek word kholÄ“. Transmission of cholera usually occurs through the fecal-oral route because of contaminated food or water caused by poor sanitation. The first cholera pandemic began in 1816 in India and eventually spread by trade routes infecting China, Europe, North American, and the remainder of the world. It was a…

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Rules for Preserving Health in Victorian Times

Victorians considered themselves to be health conscious. Because of their concern for their health, one Victorian publication provided a list of rules for Victorians to help preserve their health. Here is that list almost verbatim: Habitual cheerfulness and composure of mind, arising from peace of conscience, constant reliance on the goodness of God, and the…

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Cold Sea Bathing in the Georgian Era

Cold sea bathing in the Georgian Era was thought to have curative or therapeutic properties and be more than merely a cold bath. The salt made it a “medicated bath,” and as salt was considered to be a stimulant, it was also “an efficacious cleanser of the glands of the skin.” Cold bathing was also…

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Mineral Springs and Watering-Places of Georgian Times

From early times, mineral waters were used to remove or alleviate disease. Waters at watering-places were often ascribed to the occult and sometimes said to be miraculous in their abilities to cure disease, both chronic and acute. Some people had such belief in the mysterious agency of mineral waters they entertained exaggerated notions of their…

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Masturbation Among Victorian Youth in Boarding Schools

The term masturbation was first introduced in the 18th century. At the time, however, the terms onanism or self-pollution were more frequently used to describe masturbation, terms that Victorians also used. Additionally, in the 19th century, masturbation was more politely referred to as self-abuse or sometimes manualization, as it was done by hand.

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Regency Poisons

Poisons were an important topic in the Regency Era and because of the interest in poisons, a lengthy article was published in 1828 that provide all sorts of information about poisons, including class III poisons designated as “Sedative, or Narcotic Poisons.” All of these poisons could be ingested or applied to the body and were…

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Death By Peas and Other Foods

Food was not always safe in the 1800s, and all sorts of foods could cause death. For example, a 22-year-old woman decided to eat raw rice mixed with milk, and afterwards drank her hot tea. A few hours later she fell ill and complained of severe stomach pain, which was caused from the rice swelling.…

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Georgian Rules to Promote Long Life

Sir John Sinclair, 1st Baronet, was a Scottish writer who primarily wrote about finance and agriculture but is perhaps best known for writing the 21-volume, Statistical Account of Scotland. Sinclair, like other people of Georgian times, was also interested in how to achieve a long life. This resulted in him writing a brief article in…

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Curing Headaches in Georgian Times

Georgian physicians claimed there were all sorts of causes for headaches. Some of the stranger causes included atmospheric changes, bile in the blood, too much iron, bowel issues, thunderstorms, and indigestion. Just as Georgian physicians believed there were many causes for headaches, physicians also offered a wide variety of solutions to headache sufferers. Some of…

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