Footwear

Bicycle Footwear for 1898

When the second bicycle craze hit in the 1890s, so too did the controversy over what footwear was right for bicycling. A transformation was taking place in the feminine bicycle boot, with extremes going from one to the other. “Mannish young women” had become all the rage and their choice of bicycle boots created a…

Read More

The “Immoral Shoe”

In 1898, the Shoemakers’ Guild of Vienna held an exhibition and showcase of the newest and latest styles of boots and shoes. Among the specimens exhibited was  a pair of  “extraordinary” shoes, or rather boots, shown to the right. These boots became known as the “immoral shoe,” because they were “censured and confiscated by the…

Read More

Boot Styles of 1870

In 1870, women’s outfits were long, flowing, and often covered their feet, but that didn’t mean women thought any less about the footwear worn under their dresses or skirts. Women wore a dizzying assortment of fashions—ballroom, evening, morning, shopping, traveling, and walking outfits—and this created a desire for an array of footwear to match such…

Read More

Shoe Styles Old and New

Shoes can be traced back to early man, with the simplest shoes being nothing more than a sole fastened to the foot with straps. Over time, shoes became more substantial and eventually a fashion statement for the feet. Similar to other fashions, shoe styles faded and revived with the era, and the modern shoes of…

Read More

Men’s Boots – Hessians, Wellingtons, Bluchers, and Ankle-Jacks

Boots have been worn by men for years because they are hard-wearing and long-lasting. During medieval times, riding boots started to be used in heraldry. In the nineteenth century, because boots generally had a bootstrap (a loop at the top on either side), the saying developed “pull yourself up by your bootstraps,” meaning a person…

Read More