Crime and Criminals

John Bellingham, Assassin of Prime Minister Spencer Perceval

The Russian ship Soleure (or Sojus) belonged to Solomon van Brienen and Vassiley Popoff, and it was lost at sea in 1803. At the time, it was insured through Lloyd’s of London. The ship’s owners filed a claim to receive restitution for their loss. Unfortunately, Lloyd’s of London received an anonymous letter alleging the ship…

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Art Theft of the Princesse de Lamballe Painting in the 1980s

Princesse de Lamballe, who was Marie Antoinette’s friend and her Superintendent of the Household, married the heir of the richest man in France. Because the princesse was royalty and because she was rich, many people were intrigued by her and many portraits were painted of her. One well-known painting that is currently displayed at Versailles…

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Wrong Doings of Married Women

In 1833, two English women — a Mrs. Emma Lush (wife to a groom employed by the Royal Family) and Mrs. Sarah Wolfe (a servant in a distinguished family) — decided to go on a shopping excursion. After making several purchases, they fell into the company of two strangers who prevailed upon them to accompany…

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The Murder of Comte d’Antraigues and His Wife

Emmanuel Henri Louis Alexandre de Launay, comte d’Antraigues, was a French citizen. While living in France, d’Antraigues become involved in an incident known as the Favras Plot. When his involvement was discovered he fled to avoid execution. His mistress, a celebrated French operatic soprano named Madame de Saint-Huberty, followed him. They eventually married and lived…

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“The Monsters” or the “Vere Street Gang” Homosexuals

Police received a tip about the “rendezvous of a society of miscreants of a detestable description.”[1] These rendezvous involved homosexuals and had been occurring for six months at the White Swan. Based on tips, police raided a public house on Sunday, 8 July 1810 that was located on Vere-street. When officers searched it, they netted…

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The Unsolved Victorian Robbery of Baum, Sons and Co.

On Saturday evening, 3 December 1864, about nine o’clock in the evening, the bill-broker, money exchanger, and bullion merchant, Baum, Sons and Co. was locked up and closed until Monday morning. Baum, Sons and Co. was located at 58 Lombard Street in London, and Mr. Peter Frederick Baum had been in business some 40 years.…

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Executed for Jealousy, Elizabeth Richardson

Elizabeth Richardson (alias Forrester) was seduced at an early age and when older, she subsisted on wages made from “casual prostitution.” It was her casual prostitution that allowed her to meet an attorney named William Pilmott (perhaps Pilmot or even Pimlot or Pimlott). His chambers were located at Symond’s Inn. Their relationship seemed to be…

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Detecting the Villainous in Georgian London

Country folk visiting Georgian London and returning unscathed with their purse or their virtue intact was a rare thing. It was easy for gullible country visitors to be taken advantage of by nefarious crooks. Crooks sought to obtain a country person’s hard-earned cash or to despoil an innocent virgin and turn her into a whore.…

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Regency Female Prisoners at Newgate

The living standards for rural women in England and Wales appears to have become worse as the Industrial Revolution progressed. Moreover, it affected younger and younger rural women. This may have been one reason why one 1960s study shows that in 1795, the average age of a woman incarcerated was 36.94. By 1809, the average…

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