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Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter S (Sa-Sh)

By Geri Walton | January 6, 2014

The following slang, euphemisms, and terms are for the letter S, from Sa to Sh, and primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations

By Geri Walton | January 3, 2014

The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations or The Great Exhibition was also referred to as the Crystal Palace Exhibition, as that was the name of temporary structure where the exhibition was housed. The exhibition was an international event (essentially a world’s fair) and the first in a series of popular…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter R

By Geri Walton | January 2, 2014

The following slang, euphemisms, and terms are for the letter R and primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter Q

By Geri Walton | December 20, 2013

The following slang, euphemisms, and terms are for the letter Q and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Pickpockets and Pickpocketing in the 1700 and 1800s

By Geri Walton | December 18, 2013

In the 1700 and 1800s times were hard. Orphans, street children, or the very poor sometimes became apprenticed to men who dabbled in the art of pickpocketing. Two well-known, but fictional pickpockets, Fagin and The Artful Dodger, were made famous in Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist. Similar to Dickens’ characters, young pickpockets needed to be…

Brougham Carriages: A Popular Carriage of the 1800s

By Geri Walton | December 17, 2013

Brougham carriages were originally designed as a light, four-wheeled, enclosed, one-horse vehicle. They also had two centers doors, and a low coupe body that enclosed a forward facing seat for two occupants. Sometimes they came equipped with two extra fold away seats, which could be used for children. Outside, at the front for the coachman,…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter P

By Geri Walton | December 16, 2013

The following slang, euphemisms, and terms are for the letter P and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Dressing Order for Ladies in the 1700 and 1800s

By Geri Walton | December 12, 2013

Throughout the Georgian, Regency, and Victorian Eras, ladies were required to wear numerous layers of clothing. These layers served a variety of purposes from hygiene to warmth to ornamentation. To help you understand the complexity of dressing and what was required for a woman to put on and take off in a single day, I…

Hat Fashions for November 1896 Showing the Latest Styles

By Geri Walton | December 10, 2013

Victorian hat fashions for November 1896 were substantial and large, and women like American socialite Alva Belmont or the miserly Hetty Green embraced these big hat fashions. Big hats also gave milliners an excuse to decorate with large frills and massive puffs of velvet or ribbon. High crowns, some in bell shapes and others almost…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter O

By Geri Walton | December 9, 2013

The following are slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter O and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.