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Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter H

By Geri Walton | November 13, 2013

The following are interesting slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter H and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Scurvy: A Horrible Disease in the 1700 and 1800s

By Geri Walton | November 11, 2013

Scurvy was first noticed as a disease in the time of Hippocrates, and, during the Crusades, soldiers reported suffering from some mysterious ailment that Jean de Joinville described as a disorder that “soon increased so much in the army … barbers were forced to cut away very large pieces of flesh from the gums to…

Patches or Mouchets: Beautifying the Face

By Geri Walton | November 9, 2013

Patching was a strange fashion, and one of the earliest written mentions of the practice in England, “occurs in Bulwer’s Artificial Changeling (1653). ‘Our ladies,’ he complains, ‘have lately entertained a vain custom of spotting their faces, out of an affectation of a mole, to set off their beauty, such as Venus had; and it…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter G

By Geri Walton | November 8, 2013

The following are interesting slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter G and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letters E and F

By Geri Walton | November 6, 2013

The following historical slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter e and f are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811. Here they are:

Dengue Fever: A Quick Look

By Geri Walton | November 5, 2013

Dengue fever is a viral disease transmitted by several mosquito species and first recognized in the late 1770s. Although dengue fever has a red rash similar to measles and a much lower mortality rate than yellow fever, in the 1700s it was often mistaken for yellow fever, which was prevalent in the West Indies during…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter D

By Geri Walton | November 2, 2013

The following slang, euphemisms, and terms are for the letter D and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Halloween in the 1800s in America and Great Britain

By Geri Walton | October 31, 2013

The name “Halloween” evolved over time. It was shortened from All Hallows’ Even and All Hallows Day — the evening of All Hallows’ Day and another name for All Saints’ Day, respectively. Eventually, it was contracted to “Halloween and just as the name Halloween evolved, the holiday evolved too throughout Great Britain and the United…

Kensal Green Cemetery: A London Cemetery

By Geri Walton | October 30, 2013

Kensal Green Cemetery was opened in 1833 in the area of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London England. That was because from the beginning of the 1800s, public attention was drawn to the problems associated with cemeteries and their overcrowding in the midst of London. For instance, one article published in the…

Père Lachaise Cemetery in the 1800s

By Geri Walton | October 28, 2013

In the 1840s Père Lachaise Cemetery was considered one of the most celebrated cemeteries in the world. It received its name from Louis XIV’s confessor, a French Jesuit priest named Père François de la Chaise, and because the land was attached to his name, that was the name Napoleon Bonaparte decided to give it when…