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Halloween in the 1800s in America and Great Britain

By Geri Walton | October 31, 2013

The name “Halloween” evolved over time. It was shortened from All Hallows’ Even and All Hallows Day — the evening of All Hallows’ Day and another name for All Saints’ Day, respectively. Eventually, it was contracted to “Halloween and just as the name Halloween evolved, the holiday evolved too throughout Great Britain and the United…

Kensal Green Cemetery: A London Cemetery

By Geri Walton | October 30, 2013

Kensal Green Cemetery was opened in 1833 in the area of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London England. That was because from the beginning of the 1800s, public attention was drawn to the problems associated with cemeteries and their overcrowding in the midst of London. For instance, one article published in the…

Père Lachaise Cemetery in the 1800s

By Geri Walton | October 28, 2013

In the 1840s Père Lachaise Cemetery was considered one of the most celebrated cemeteries in the world. It received its name from Louis XIV’s confessor, a French Jesuit priest named Père François de la Chaise, and because the land was attached to his name, that was the name Napoleon Bonaparte decided to give it when…

Puerperal Fever: A Dreadful Consequence of Childbirth

By Geri Walton | October 26, 2013

From the 1600s through the mid-1800s, puerperal fever, or childbed fever as it was more commonly called, affected women with severe and acute symptoms such as abdominal pain and fever. Puerperal was considered to be just a dreaded consequence of childbirth and motherhood. That was because beginning in the seventeenth century “lying-in” hospitals became popular…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter C

By Geri Walton | October 25, 2013

The following are interesting slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter C and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Bloodletting: Its Popularity in the 1700 and 1800s

By Geri Walton | October 24, 2013

Bloodletting is the withdrawal of blood from a patient to prevent illness or cure disease and could involve bloodletting performed by bloodletters or by applying leeches. Bloodletting began in ancient times to cure or prevent disease. It was based on ancient medicine and the idea “humors” — blood and other bodily fluids — needed to…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter B

By Geri Walton | October 22, 2013

The following are slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter B and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Condoms: Its History and Use in the 1700 and 1800s

By Geri Walton | October 20, 2013

The earliest written description of condoms is from the sixteenth century, although it seems they were probably in use before that time. The name “condom” alleged was coined by Charles II when Dr. Condom or Conton gave him an oiled sheep intestines to use. However, other people believe the name came from the Latin word…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter A

By Geri Walton | October 19, 2013

The following are slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter A and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Victorian Mourning: An Art Form in the 19th Century

By Geri Walton | October 18, 2013

Victorian mourning was an art form among the upper crust in nineteenth century England. There were many complex rules and mourning was expected to be exteriorized, not only by obvious sorrow but also by wearing black clothing that was sometimes worn for months and months. In addition, superstition often accompanied mourning and included such things…