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Hat Fashions for March 1897: Foreshadow for Summer

By Geri Walton | December 2, 2013

The glory of the summer was foreshadowed in the new hat fashions for March of 1897. According to the women’s magazine, The Delineator, flowers were one sign spring had arrived, with “both natural and art colors … in the season’s blossoms.”[1] The most popular flowers for spring, were “field flowers, roses, garlands of lilacs, bunches…

Bonnets of the 1830s

By Geri Walton | November 25, 2013

Bonnets were one of the most popular types of headgear during the nineteenth century. They were worn for numerous occasions from social events to dinner parties to evening carriage rides. However, bonnets of the 1830s were not just pretty headgear or fashionable displays for women’s heads. They were also considered the only proper headgear when…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter M

By Geri Walton | November 22, 2013

The following are slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter M and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Father of the Bicycle and Who Invented It

By Geri Walton | November 21, 2013

There is controversy over who invented the bicycle. Some people claim it was a French carriage maker and blacksmith named Pierre Michaux. Other people assert it was Michaux’s son, Ernest. Still other people maintain it was not Michaux or his son, but rather another Frenchman entirely. His name was Pierre Lallement and he lived near…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter L

By Geri Walton | November 20, 2013

The following are interesting slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter L and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms for the 1700 and 1800s – Letters I, J, and K

By Geri Walton | November 18, 2013

The following are interesting slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letters I, J, and K and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Georgian Headdresses of the 1770s, 1780s, and 1790s

By Geri Walton | November 15, 2013

Georgian headdresses of the 1770s, 1780s, and 1790s underwent changes and went from extremely towering hairstyles and tall headdresses to less lofty creations. However, between 1770 and 1780 extraordinary super-structures made a distinct fashion statement that is still talked of today. That was because the French considered their hair or headdresses to be one of…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter H

By Geri Walton | November 13, 2013

The following are interesting slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter H and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Scurvy: A Horrible Disease in the 1700 and 1800s

By Geri Walton | November 11, 2013

Scurvy was first noticed as a disease in the time of Hippocrates, and, during the Crusades, soldiers reported suffering from some mysterious ailment that Jean de Joinville described as a disorder that “soon increased so much in the army … barbers were forced to cut away very large pieces of flesh from the gums to…

Patches or Mouchets: Beautifying the Face

By Geri Walton | November 9, 2013

Patching was a strange fashion, and one of the earliest written mentions of the practice in England, “occurs in Bulwer’s Artificial Changeling (1653). ‘Our ladies,’ he complains, ‘have lately entertained a vain custom of spotting their faces, out of an affectation of a mole, to set off their beauty, such as Venus had; and it…