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Phaetons

By Geri Walton | November 19, 2013

Phaetons were stylish, four-wheeled carriages, with or without tops that usually had no side pieces in front by the seats. The name phaeton comes from Phaëton who was the mythical son of Helios (the personification of the Sun in Greek mythology).  Phaëton was said to have driven the Sun Chariot so dangerously he almost caught…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms for the 1700 and 1800s – Letters I, J, and K

By Geri Walton | November 18, 2013

The following are interesting slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letters I, J, and K and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Evening Gowns of 1839

By Geri Walton | November 15, 2013

Victorian era evening gowns of 1839 emphasized a woman’s figure with their bodices that tapered to a small point at the front and the skirt’s low waistline. Gown bodices were also tight and form-fitting, but beneath them were even tighter and more constricting garments. Corsets with gores made it almost impossible to breathe but women…

Georgian Headdresses of the 1770s, 1780s, and 1790s

By Geri Walton | November 15, 2013

Georgian headdresses of the 1770s, 1780s, and 1790s underwent changes and went from extremely towering hairstyles and tall headdresses to less lofty creations. However, between 1770 and 1780 extraordinary super-structures made a distinct fashion statement that is still talked of today. That was because the French considered their hair or headdresses to be one of…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter H

By Geri Walton | November 13, 2013

The following are interesting slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter H and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Scurvy: A Horrible Disease in the 1700 and 1800s

By Geri Walton | November 11, 2013

Scurvy was first noticed as a disease in the time of Hippocrates, and, during the Crusades, soldiers reported suffering from some mysterious ailment that Jean de Joinville described as a disorder that “soon increased so much in the army … barbers were forced to cut away very large pieces of flesh from the gums to…

Patches or Mouchets: Beautifying the Face

By Geri Walton | November 9, 2013

Patching was a strange fashion, and one of the earliest written mentions of the practice in England, “occurs in Bulwer’s Artificial Changeling (1653). ‘Our ladies,’ he complains, ‘have lately entertained a vain custom of spotting their faces, out of an affectation of a mole, to set off their beauty, such as Venus had; and it…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter G

By Geri Walton | November 8, 2013

The following are interesting slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter G and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letters E and F

By Geri Walton | November 6, 2013

The following historical slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter e and f are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811. Here they are:

Dengue Fever: A Quick Look

By Geri Walton | November 5, 2013

Dengue fever is a viral disease transmitted by several mosquito species and first recognized in the late 1770s. Although dengue fever has a red rash similar to measles and a much lower mortality rate than yellow fever, in the 1700s it was often mistaken for yellow fever, which was prevalent in the West Indies during…