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Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter O

By Geri Walton | December 9, 2013

The following are slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter O and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Evening Hairstyles of the 1860s by Henri de Bysterveld

By Geri Walton | December 6, 2013

During the 1860s, Henri de Bysterveld, a hairdresser and editor of the Gazette of Hair, published several books and elevated hairdressing to an art form. He was inspired by antiquity (the Greeks and the Romans) and the 1600 and 1700s. People claimed he was a magician when it came to styling hair, and they reported…

Hat Fashions for February 1898

By Geri Walton | December 5, 2013

Midwinter millinery in February of 1898 saw few flowers as they had been replaced by feathers. Relegated to second place for a time, ostrich tips had begun to assert their supremacy once again and many midwinter hats began to sport them. The Paradise aigrette was also still busy waving over dressy hats, but it was…

Child Rat Catchers of the Victorian Era

By Geri Walton | December 4, 2013

By the Victorian Era it was common knowledge that rats carried diseases, and thousands of them were known to infest London sewers, factories, and homes just like they had infested France in Montfaucon in 1828. In the seasons when rats overran London, rat catchers were in high demand. Moreover, rats could be a big problem…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms for the1700 and 1800s – Letter N

By Geri Walton | December 3, 2013

The following are slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter N and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Hat Fashions for March 1897

By Geri Walton | December 2, 2013

The glory of the 1897 summer was foreshadowed in the new hats designed for March of 1897. According to the women’s magazine, The Delineator, flowers were one sign spring had arrived, with “both natural and art colors … in the season’s blossoms.” The most popular flowers for spring, were “fields flowers, roses, garlands of lilacs,…

Bonnets of the 1830s

By Geri Walton | November 25, 2013

Bonnets were one of the most popular types of headgear during the nineteenth century. They were worn for numerous occasions from social events to dinner parties to evening carriage rides. However, bonnets of the 1830s were not just pretty headgear or fashionable displays for women’s heads. They were also considered the only proper headgear when…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter M

By Geri Walton | November 22, 2013

The following are slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter M and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.

Father of the Bicycle and Who Invented It

By Geri Walton | November 21, 2013

There is controversy over who invented the bicycle. Some people claim it was a French carriage maker and blacksmith named Pierre Michaux. Other people assert it was Michaux’s son, Ernest. Still other people maintain it was not Michaux or his son, but rather another Frenchman entirely. His name was Pierre Lallement and he lived near…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter L

By Geri Walton | November 20, 2013

The following are interesting slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter L and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811.