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Hairstyles with Bonnets in 1864 by Henri de Bysterveld

By Geri Walton | February 13, 2014

Henri de Bysterveld was a French hairdresser and editor of the Gazette of Hair who created various hairstyles with bonnets in 1864. Bysterveld also published several books and elevated hairdressing to an art form with his creations. His hairstyles often relied on Greek or Roman styles and were also inspired from Henry IV to Louis…

Baths for Medicinal Purposes in the 1800s

By Geri Walton | February 12, 2014

Public baths were established in England during the Roman supremacy, but they eventually fell to ruins. It was not until the spread of leprosy occurred during the Norman Conquest that bathing came back into style. That lasted for a few hundred years until the sixteenth century when people switched from linen to woolen clothing, and…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms for the 1700 and 1800s – Letter W

By Geri Walton | February 11, 2014

The following slang, euphemisms, and terms are for the letter W and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s 1811 Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

Children in the Victorian Era: Their Occupational Life

By Geri Walton | February 11, 2014

Children in the Victorian Era did not have the best of working lives. They lived during a time when the Industrial Revolution was in full swing and many had to work to survive. Unfortunately, there was no protective, humane, or occupational societies to look out for a child’s health or welfare. This meant children were…

Tea Times in Great Britain

By Geri Walton | February 6, 2014

Tea in Great Britain did not become popular over night. Nor did everyone believe it a beneficial beverage. In fact, Jonas Hanway, the first man brave enough to carry an umbrella in London, was a vociferous proponent against it. Hanway became so upset at Samuel Johnson for his vocal enjoyment of tea, he responded saying:

The Gig or Chaise

By Geri Walton | February 5, 2014

In the second half of the eighteenth century, as roads improved, so did the vehicles that traveled them. Among the vehicles on the road was the gig, also called a chaise or a chair. It was a lightweight, two-wheeled cart with road springs pulled by one or sometimes two horses. Passengers rode facing forward and…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms for the 1700 and 1800s – Letters U and V

By Geri Walton | February 3, 2014

The following slang, euphemisms, and terms are for the letters U and V and primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

Hat Fashions for August 1899

By Geri Walton | January 31, 2014

Hats have always always varied with the fashions, but even more than that, at least according to The Delineator, “modes in millinery run by no known law or rule, but come and go without rhyme or reason … so that no rule can be given by which the latest style of hat may be identified;…

Almack’s Assembly Rooms from the 1700s to the 1800s

By Geri Walton | January 30, 2014

Almack’s Assembly Rooms, known merely as Almack’s, was a social club that opened in London on King Street in St. James and operated from 20 February 1765 to 1871. It opened to compete against the grand social affairs given by Teresa Cornelys, an opera singer and impresario, who hosted fashionable gatherings at Carlisle House in…

Tea Rituals and a Short History of Tea in England

By Geri Walton | January 30, 2014

Tea and tea rituals were not always a part of English history. In fact, the first tea drinking royal, was not even English but rather Portuguese. She was Catherine of Braganza, bride to Charles II of England, who, when she arrived on English soil, also carried a tea-chest filled with her treasured teas. Catherine soon…