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French Winter Fashions 1867

By Geri Walton | December 11, 2013

French fashions for the fall of 1867 were generally made from either silk or velvet. Paletots were popular and so were narrow sleeves. Skirts remained wide—as it was the height of crinolines—and skirts ranged in length from the ankle to the floor. Greens, grays, and purples were the predominate colors at this time, and hats…

Hat Fashions for November 1896

By Geri Walton | December 10, 2013

Victorian hat fashions in 1896 were substantial and large, and therefore it gave milliners an excuse to decorate with large frills and massive puffs of velvet or ribbon. High crowns, some in bell shapes and others almost cylindrical, were combined with broad brims and an occasional roll in the front or the brim upturned at…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter O

By Geri Walton | December 9, 2013

The following are slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letters N and O and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811. OAK meant a man of good credit or substance in the 1700 and 1800s. OAR was a busybody or someone who meddled. OBSTROPULOUS was a deviation…

Evening Hairstyles of the 1860s

By Geri Walton | December 6, 2013

During the 1860s, Henri de Bysterveld, a hairdresser and editor of the Gazette of Hair, published several books and elevated hairdressing to an art form. His inspiration relied on antiquity (the Greeks and the Romans) and the 1600 and 1700s. People claimed he was a magician when it came to styling hair, and they reported…

Hat Fashions for February 1898

By Geri Walton | December 5, 2013

Midwinter millinery in February of 1898 saw few flowers as they had been replaced by feathers. Relegated to second place for a time, ostrich tips had begun to assert their supremacy once again and many midwinter hats began to sport them. The Paradise aigrette was also still busy waving over dressy hats, but it was…

Child Rat Catchers of the Victorian Era

By Geri Walton | December 4, 2013

By the Victorian Era it was common knowledge that rats carried diseases, and thousands of them were known to infest London sewers, factories, and homes. In the seasons when rats overran London, rat catchers were in high demand. Moreover, rats could be a big problem as reported by one Victorian rat catcher:

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms for the1700 and 1800s – Letter N

By Geri Walton | December 3, 2013

The following are slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letters N and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811. A NAB GIRDER or NOB GIRDER was a bridle, and a NANNY HOUSE was a brothel. NAP was a word used in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth…

Hat Fashions for March 1897

By Geri Walton | December 2, 2013

The glory of the 1897 summer was foreshadowed in the new hats designed for March of 1897. According to the women’s magazine, The Delineator, flowers were one sign spring had arrived, with “both natural and art colors … in the season’s blossoms.” The most popular flowers for spring, were “fields flowers, roses, garlands of lilacs,…

Bonnets of the 1830s

By Geri Walton | November 25, 2013

Bonnets were one of the most popular types of headgear during the nineteenth century. Bonnets were worn for numerous occasions from social events to dinner parties to evening carriage rides. However, 1830s bonnets were not just pretty headgear or fashionable displays for women’s heads. They were also considered the only proper headgear when going outdoors.…

Slang, Euphemisms, and Terms of the 1700 and 1800s – Letter M

By Geri Walton | November 22, 2013

The following are slang, euphemisms, and terms for the letter M and are primarily taken from Francis Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1811. MACCARONI (now spelled macaroni) was not only an Italian pasta made from flour and eggs but also a term used to describe a fop. It was claimed that…