America/United States

The History of Goody Two-Shoes

The History of Goody Two-Shoes (with or without a hyphen) was a children’s story written anonymously in 1765, published by John Newbery, and a variation of the story of Cinderella. Goody Two-Shoes was the nickname of a poor orphan named Margery Meanwell who goes through life with one shoe until a rich gentleman gives her…

Read More

The Cold or Catarrh in the Late 1800s

Many doctors of the late 1800s wrote about and investigated the cold, or at it was often called, catarrh. Nineteenth-century doctors also had advice about the best ways to avoid or prevent a cold. Of course, that was not always possible and so when a cold happened, doctors and even quacks wanted to cure it…

Read More

Napoleon Bonaparte’s Youngest Brother Jerome Bonaparte

Jerome Bonaparte was Napoleon’s youngest sibling. He was born on the island of Corsica on 15 November 1784 and was barely three months old when his father died. Napoleon soon became responsible for his education, something that Jerome was unwilling to apply himself to as everything other than his studies was of more interest to…

Read More

Benjamin Franklin’s Popularity with French Women

Benjamin Franklin’s popularity with French women happened long before he was appointed Ambassador of France. When he landed on French soil in December of 1776, having set sail on 26 October as agent of a diplomatic commission, women (and probably men too) wanted to catch a glimpse of the experimenter with lightning and the defender…

Read More

Benjamin Franklin in Passy, France

Benjamin Franklin served as an American Ambassador to France from 1776 to 1785. For much of the time he was there — from March of 1777 to July of 1785 — Franklin lived in a rural area known as Passy. Today, Passy is included within the realms of Paris, but at the time, Passy was…

Read More

The American Traveler in Victorian Europe

Travel was popular in the Victorian Era and among some of the most prominent travelers to Europe were Americans, nicknamed Yankees. They crossed the seas by steamers and traveled throughout Europe primarily by rail. The most desirable season for Americans to travel varied on the destination with winter travelers heading to Spain, Italy, or Egypt.…

Read More